Daily Living by Daily Dying (Matthew 16:21-27)

Many of the monuments at the Antietam National Battlefield have symbols upon them. They are not immediately obvious in most cases. The prime exception is in the West Woods area, where you drive into a beautiful tree-lined park setting. Entering between two cement pillars along the Hagerstown Turnpike, many guests will notice and comment upon seeing cloverleaf symbols upon them, as well as on the large obelisk monument in the middle of this park area.

The first guess is that these symbols represent the Irish Brigade – a famous Civil War unit in the Federal Army that indeed fight at Antietam, but not in this location. They entered the battle in the area of the 1897-constructed observation tower.

Rather, the pillars originally supported an iron gate with the inscription “Philadelphia Brigade Park.”  This Union outfit featured four regiments from the Philadelphia area who were a part of the Second Corps of the Federal Army. The cloverleaf symbol (called a trefoil, used also at times in history to depict the Trinity), was the chosen emblem of the Second Corps of the army. A circle was the First Corps, for example, and an iron cross depicted the Sixth Corps. Varied colors then also depicted the divisions within a corps – a red symbol always being the first division of said corps, white for the second, blue for the third.

These symbols were called “corps badges” and were devised by General Hooker in the spring of 1863. But, but … Antietam was in 1862!  Correct!  These badges were on uniforms, hats, flags, etc., and became symbols of great pride. And even though not yet invented at the time of the September, 1862 Battle of Antietam, they adorn many of the monuments put there by veterans who returned decades later to recall the sacrifices of their fallen brothers and comrades.

Many of us take pride in varied symbols, be they of a favorite sports team, business association or line of clothing. It is all about identity. Being associated with the symbol and what it represents says something about our values without even a word being spoken.

We all like to be a part of a winning outfit. And surely there was a lot of personal excitement in being called to be one of Jesus’ disciples … to drop the fishing enterprise and follow the Messiah around the country and be a part of the preaching, the miracles, the crowds, etc.  Cool!

But likely the disciples did not anticipate the opposition that was profoundly present at so many places. It was disconcerting for sure that the “deep state” religious leaders in Israel were so routinely opposed to Jesus and the message of the Kingdom. Much of this looked rather dangerous even. Violence was narrowly averted on several occasions (like when the hometown folks in Galilee in Luke 4 took Jesus up to a cliff to toss him over the edge!).

As the time for Christ’s final work was approaching, Jesus began to rather explicitly tell the 12 exactly what was going to be his upcoming experience …

Matthew 16:21 – From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life.

How could this be? This is not at all what the disciples signed up for when agreeing to drop their nets and go fishing for men. Jesus – the Messiah (as in the previous paragraph Peter was applauded for hitting the nail on the head with this declaration) – was surely not going to be killed!!  And Peter says so to Christ …

22 Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. “Never, Lord!” he said. “This shall never happen to you!”

23 Jesus turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”

For sure, Peter had the wrong picture, not that he was the only one. He was simply the one most willing to verbalize what the others were likely also thinking. The mission of the Kingdom, the work of the Messiah – all of this was to be a grand success of righteousness prevailing.

And truth does prevail; God does reign victorious. The Kingdom will be perfectly established. But, as in war, there is a price to be paid and battles to be won. There is an evil system to be defeated. To expect nothing but victories is to not understand the nature of the conflict.

24 Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 25 For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it. 26 What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul? 27 For the Son of Man is going to come in his Father’s glory with his angels, and then he will reward each person according to what they have done.

This is counterintuitive thinking for sure. To be a part of the winning outfit eternally, we must give up the natural expectation as to what constitutes victory and security. The natural self says to fight for gain in this world and prioritize self. But the true disciple does not view success in life in this manner. Rather, the guiding principle is to follow Christ whatever the cost, even knowing that the cost could be the loss of everything material. Though it may seem that Jesus is turning the world upside-down, in fact he is turning it right-side up. But the world will not receive that.

Again, not recognizing the work of Christ for what it is, the masses of people will hate the symbol of this work of Christ – the cross. Nothing was more despised and dreadful in the Roman world. Emblematic of the worst death possible for the worst people possible, it was the last of things to find one’s personal identity by open identity with it.

Yet the calling of the gospel is to be willing take up the cross, as Christ did – to bear the shame and reproach of it all. Be counterintuitive. Embrace the conflict, because the appearance of loss is turned ultimately to greatest of victories. In what is perhaps the ultimate summary statement about faith in Christ, Paul writes …

Galatians 2:20 – I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The life I now live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

This may seem like daily dying, but it is daily living.

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About Randy Buchman

I live in Western Maryland, and among my too many pursuits and hobbies, I regularly feed multiple hungry blogs. I played college baseball, coached championship cross country teams at Williamsport (MD) High School, and have been a sportswriter for various publications and online venues. My main profession is as the lead pastor of a church in Hagerstown called Tri-State Fellowship. And I'm active in Civil War history and work/serve at Antietam National Battlefield with the Antietam Battlefield Guides organization. Occasionally I sleep.

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